Admission C-reactive protein concentrations are associated with unfavourable neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Whether admission C-reactive protein (aCRP) concentrations are associated with neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is controversial. Based on established kinetics of CRP, we hypothesized that aCRP may reflect the pre-arrest state of health and investigated associations with neurological outcome. Prospectively collected data from the Vienna Clinical Cardiac Arrest Registry of the Department of Emergency Medicine were analysed. Adults (≥ 18 years) who suffered a non-traumatic OHCA between January 2013 and December 2018, without return of spontaneous circulation or extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy were eligible. The primary endpoint was a composite of unfavourable neurologic function or death (defined as Cerebral Performance Category 3-5) at 30 days. Associations of CRP levels drawn within 30 min of hospital admission were assessed using binary logistic regression. ACRP concentrations were overall low in our population (n = 832), but higher in the unfavourable outcome group [median: 0.44 (quartiles 0.15-1.44) mg/dL vs. 0.26 (0.11-0.62) mg/dL, p < 0.001]. The crude odds ratio for higher aCRP concentrations was 1.19 (95% CI 1.10-1.28, p < 0.001, per mg/dL) to have unfavourable neurological outcome. After multivariate adjustment for traditional prognostication markers the odds ratio of higher aCRP concentrations was 1.13 (95% CI 1.04-1.22, p = 0.002). Sensitivity of aCRP was low, but specificity for unfavourable neurological outcome was 90% for the cut-off at 1.5 mg/dL and 97.5% for 5 mg/dL CRP. In conclusion, high aCRP levels are associated with unfavourable neurological outcome at day 30 after OHCA.

as reported in: Sci Rep. 2021 May 13; 11(1): 10279