ACAAI Updates Guidance Related to Risk of Allergic Reactions With mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines

December 24, 2020

The American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI) has issued guidance for physicians and other providers related to the risk of an allergic reaction following vaccination with an mRNA-based coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine.

ACAAI’s recommendations are in line with guidance issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Specifically, that patients experiencing a severe allergic reaction after getting the first shot should not receive the second shot.

In addition, the ACAAI COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force recommends the following guidance for physicians and other providers:
● The mRNA COVID-19 vaccines should be administered in a healthcare setting where anaphylaxis can be treated. All individuals must be observed for at least 15 to 30 minutes after injection to monitor for any adverse reaction. All anaphylactic reactions should be managed immediately with epinephrine as first-line treatment.
● The mRNA COVID-19 vaccines should not be administered to individuals with a known history of a severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine. Although the specific vaccine component causing the anaphylaxis has not been identified, polyethylene glycol is one of its ingredients and has been known to cause anaphylaxis.
● Data related to risk in individuals with a history of allergic reactions to previous vaccinations and/or mast cell activation syndrome/idiopathic anaphylaxis is very limited and evolving. A decision to receive either of the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines that are currently approved for Emergency Use Authorisation by the US Food and Drug Administration should be undertaken by the individual, along with their physician or other provider administering the vaccine using their professional judgment balancing the benefits and risks associated with taking the vaccine.
● People with common allergies to medications, foods, inhalants, insects and latex are no more likely than the general public to have an allergic reaction to the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. Those patients should be informed of the benefits of the vaccine versus its risks.
● The mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are not live vaccines and can be administered to immunocompromised patients. Physicians and other providers should inform such immunocompromised patients of the possibility of a diminished immune response to the vaccines.

Reference: https://acaai.org/news/american-college-allergy-asthma-and-immunology-up...

SOURCE: American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology